Sunday, 26 February 2012

Burda Style 02-2012-106 Fan Dance Coat, or how to de glamourize a pattern for household use

I am often amused by Burda Style magazine. I was particularly taken with the Asian Inspiration section in the February issue, especially the suggestion that "The elegant coat of silk satin print will accompany you to the theatre"
This is lovely, but personally, should I observe someone wearing such a garment to the theatre, I would strongly suspect that they wanted an early night, and felt that going out in their dressing gown would save them a few minutes at the end of the evening.
Having a certain reluctance to use silk satin for a first time pattern exploration, I trialled this pattern using some extremely loud and large print quilting cotton that a friend bought for me whilst she was in Japan. This should help to wake me up each morning.
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It is rather windy today, so the photograph makes the garment look a little skewed.
I have used two colourways of the same print, not having sufficient of either, to make the dressing gown, but it is hard to see this combination of fabrics due to the stunning nature of the print.

Although this is a very simple pattern, at first glance not unlike the New Look pattern I have been using for the past 10 years or so for family dressing gowns, it has some very nice details.
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The all in one front and collar is shaped with a long dart, which sits very nicely around the neck, and the sleeves have a very pleasant bell shape, which somehow escapes being too large and impractical for important tasks such as tea drinking.

The Burda directions are not too bad, except where they instruct you to baste the collar then sew from the right side. Instead of doing this, I clipped the inner dart to the seam line, then hand stitched the collar to the neck and shoulders.
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Photograph of clipping at dart prior to hand stitching
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I added flat piping to the collar/facing seam, and added a inner tie at waist level. My belt is wider than Burda's, and I tapered out the side and back seams below the waist, as I am not shaped in the least like a kimono. I probably did not need to do this, as the smallest size 36-38 has generous ease. I made a square shoulder adjustment, but no further fitting alterations.
I flat felled the centre back seam, and bound the other seams with bias binding, having just read the Colette sewing book and being inspired to make things nicely.
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Do I need a pretty silk-satin dressing gown as well?

20 comments:

Gabrielle said...

This is just beautiful - I thought you were the Burda model and that they were showing an alternative use to the theatre! Looks beautifully made and very special on you.

Mary said...

Wow, that is an amazing dressing gown. I love the chrysanthemums and the tropical colors. You did such a nice job and the piping is wonderful.

katherine h said...

I'm sure that your morning cup of tea will taste all the better for you looking so fabulous!

velosewer said...

Yum! That's so elegant and beautiful. The piping does lots to show the style line too.

Sherry said...

What a beautiful print, and it makes a beautiful dressing gown, even in two colourways! They are so close I would never have noticed had you not mentioned it.

Bernice said...

Won't you look very elegant in the mornings. The fabric is so pretty and such a great print for this style of garment. A silk one? Well can the lady of the house ever have too many gorgeous dressing gowns? Certainly not.

Karin said...

This looks great in the quilting cotton! And you can just fling it in the washing machine too! I like the addition of piping. It makes a subtle but perceptible difference.

SewRuthie said...

It's lovely!!!! But yes you need a silk one too :-)

Janine said...

THis dressing gown looks as good as any silk satin version - if you are like me though you would be bound to get tea and vegemite stains on your satin version . I am assuming though that normally you would be in bed with your husband bringing your morning cup of tea in to you rather than standing on the verandah. I remember many years ago Princess Diana wore something like a dressing gown to some evening function and was panned so if she couldn`t pull this look off then us mere mortals would have no chance.

Sue said...

I love it. Wonder if I've anything vaguely suitable in the stash?

Kelley said...

I love your new dressing gown, but I do agree with your assessment of the original garment's purpose. I can't imagine anyone seriously wearing that coat out in public as anything other than a dressing gown.

The cotton you've used for your version is exquisite. I bet it feels good, too. And it's such a great weight for our climate.

Audrey said...

The robe looks just a lovely in the cotton print as the silk satin, and is much more practical.

Mary Nanna said...

Ha - it's fantastic.

I do not understand the whole "nightwear as evening wear" trend at present. I saw a picture of Sophia Coppula trying to look cool in what can only be described as PJ's - even someone who has perfected the look of disdained indifference still looked silly venturing forth looking like she forgot to get dressed that morning.

Sharon said...

Wonderful dressing gown and agree I can't see the original being worn to the theatre, unless they meant the operating theatre. Now a silk version is a must, very decadent.

Gail said...

Very glam and beautifully made.

ejvc said...

It's clear that it needs to be made in silk satin, and by, you, but you don't need to keep it (HINT).

Seriously though this one is Lovely (that's with a capital L), and if I were you I'd be tempted to wear it all the time, or at least schedule days where only tea-drinking was required.

cidell said...

I've been thinking about a robe and didn't event notice this one! I love the print.

janessewandtell said...

Lovely dressing gown!

Lynneb said...

That is a fabulous robe! Oh, the fabric is a perfect choice for this pattern. It's just beautiful, and the piping details are lovely!

Sew Sister said...

I love your fabric for this robe, very nice robe!